A photograph of two women

 By Hon Dr Sharman Stone, Australia’s Ambassador for Women and Girls Over the past year, a few simple words like “#TimesUp” and “#MeToo” have inspired tens of thousands of women around the world to share their stories and advocate their rights. As the movement continues in 2018, I’m keen to use my role as Australia’s […]

Imagine if you regularly waited months to receive medical supplies, food and water, and then when the ship finally arrived it took up to three weeks to unload due to the increased frequency of adverse weather conditions caused by climate change. This is the reality for the people of Nauru. That is why Australia is partnering with Nauru, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Green Climate Fund (GCF) to build a climate resilient, safe deep water port to facilitate the speedy delivery of essential supplies and to encourage increased trade and economic activity in the country.

One of the best parts of my job is meeting the workers from Kiribati, Tuvalu and Nauru, involved in the Program. I particularly enjoy seeing them grow into their new jobs and life in Australia. They make an astonishing journey coming to Australia, leaving behind their families, children and community. They do this for the opportunity to gain skills and experience, and ensure that their families have money for education, health and household needs.

On International Volunteer Day 2017, Australian volunteer Brad Timms serves as a shining example of the personal, professional and profound lasting benefits of international volunteering.

Each year more than 1,000 Australians donate their time and skills to volunteer in developing countries through the Government’s flagship Australian Volunteers program, helping to make our region more stable, secure and prosperous. On this International Volunteer Day I thank all Australian Volunteers – past and present – for their selfless contribution to regional growth and prosperity.

The Jessore clinic was full of women and children of all ages and the clinic’s triage nurse was busy conducting eye examinations. I soon met an elderly patient named Monowara. She sat in the waiting room with a kind smile on her face. I immediately noticed opacity in her eyes – a tell-tale sign of cataracts.

On 19 November, take a moment to think about the 4.5 billion people who live without a household toilet that safely disposes of their waste. Even better, get inspired to do something about it.